Day 2938 – What I Wish I Knew About Writing A Book When I Started

When I was a kid, I wanted to be a writer. I wrote a few stories, a bunch of poems, and journaled a lot. I’m so thankful that my younger self kept a journal like she did. It let’s me look back, and know where I’ve come from and how much I’ve changed. It wasn’t until I was grown that I knew I had to write a book. It took me SO long to write my first book.

I think most people have a book in them. I think that YOU have something to say. So what do I wish I knew? Here’s a few things, and hopefully, they will help you as you start (and FINISH) your book.

– You will start from scratch several times. That first time that you have to start from scratch is really difficult. It feels like you’ve wasted all this time, but it is needed in the process.

– Just write. Getting anything down on paper is a good exercise.

– You will think you’re done, but you are far from it. (Rinse and repeat this one)

– You will print out many, many drafts of your book.

– You need to love the editing process. You need to love ensuring that your words are having their desired impact.

– There are smarter people than you, use them. I’m SO glad I hired editors for my books. It brought my books to another level, and made them much more helpful.

– Reading continually will help you as a writer. I’ve gotten some great ideas, and received inspiration through the books I’ve read.

– Have a music playlist at the ready for your writing time. Classical music or soundtracks are my go to for this. In particular, I listen to a playlist of 40 cello classics.

– Have a set place you write, or at least a routine. It really helps to get your brain into writing mode.

– Don’t hold your words too tightly. You might think they’re beautiful and perfect, but they might not be clear. It helps to read your words out loud.

– Enjoy the whole process. Once you learn it, you won’t freak out when you have to start over, when you have to have your words chopped up, when you want to throw in the towel….again.

– And above all – keep writing.

When can I read YOUR book?

How do you like my editing pen?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Did you like what you read? Here’s some ways you can support us and this blog!
Join our Facebook group, Planning an Epic Road Trip on Any Budget
Join the Journey With The G’s email list (bonus – you get my Epic Road Trip Budget spreadsheet)
Buy my book, Planning an Epic Road Trip on any Budget
Buy my book, Trusting God With 2 Cents: 22 Days To Becoming A Successful Christian Business Owner.
Shop on Amazon (no additional cost to you, this gives us a percentage of what you order).
Check out our resources page.
Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

This entry was posted in Christianity, Life and tagged , , by 365 days of marriage. Bookmark the permalink.

About 365 days of marriage

I started this blog in April of 2011. At the time, Bret and I were wedding photographers and it was a way to share how marriage is more about the day to day and so much more than the wedding day itself. For about 5 years, I blogged about the joys and sorrows of the Christian walk, marriage, work, family and friends. I’ve blogged every day since a few weeks after I started. In May of 2015, we photographed our last wedding. Now, I have become passionate about simplicity, particularly in marriage, Christianity, business, travel and life. For a number of reasons, we have become minimalists. I’ve found that having simplicity makes life so much deeper, refreshing and joyful. I hope that this blog will help others see the benefits of living simply.

2 thoughts on “Day 2938 – What I Wish I Knew About Writing A Book When I Started

  1. Yes, I’ve learned many of these things over time as well. The things I always encourage aspiring authors are: write every day, work on one project at a time, and have a plan for your book before you start writing. It’s amazing how intentional and consistent persistence can lead to tremendous results!

    • One thing I should add is that having a plan of what I’m going to write/work on the day before. It saves me from the “what should I write?” problem when I sit in front of the keyboard. Writing in the morning is when I’m best, but if I have to use too much energy figuring out the next step, it’s no good. I can see the correlations when I actually write every day. One of my struggles is the time right after I publish a book. I want to “give myself time off” but it seems to stunt my momentum. Thanks for the comment!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s